Need Help Finding a Service?
CLICK HERE - It's Free
  
11/15/2018

Add Environmental
Yellow Pages
To Your Site

Business Center
Business Reviews
Free Directories
Upgrade Your Listing
Environmental Bids & RFP Services
Financing Available
Dust Collectors
Mist Eliminators
Precipitators
Incinerators
Scrubbers
Filters
Ammonia Slip Analyzers
Chemiluminescence Analyzers
CO Analyzers
CO2 Analyzers
Flame Ionization Analyzers
HC Analyzers
Infrared Analyzers
Multi-Point Samplers
NOX Analyzers
Paramagnetic Analyzers
Photoacoustic Analyzers
Photoacoustic IR Analyzers
Process Control Analyzers
Tracer Gas Systems
VOC Analyzers
Remediation
WMD Equipment
Air Monitoring
PID Rental
Water Quality
Water Sampling
NFPA Labels
Waste Labels
Flammable Labels
Lighting Equipment
Pumping Equipment
Cubic Yard Boxes
55 Gallon Drums
Hazardous Waste Drums
Overpack Drums
Plastic Drums
Submit Resume
View Resumes
Environmental
Insurance
Reports & Mapping
Environmental
Software
Tank Inspection Services
Mold & Mildew Info
Mold Franchise
Mold Test Kits
Mold Training
OSHA Training
EPA Training
Wetland Training
Pumps
Water Wastewater
Grease Trap Bacteria
Pond Bacteria
Septic Tank Bacteria
* Celebrating our 22th year *
[ Home > Resources > Education > Periodic Table of the Elements ]
Neon

For lights

Atomic Number: 10
Atomic Symbol: Ne
Atomic Weight: 20.179
Electron Configuration: [He]2s22p6

History

(Gr. neos, new) Discovered by Ramsay and Travers in 1898. Neon is a rare gaseous element present in the atmosphere to the extent of 1 part in 65,000 of air. It is obtained by liquefaction of air and separated from the other gases by fractional distillation.

Isotopes

Natural neon is a mixture of three isotopes. Six other unstable isotopes are known.

Compounds

Neon, a very inert element, is however said to form a compound with fluorine. It is still questionable if true compounds of neon exist, but evidence is mounting in favor of their existence. The ions, Ne+, (NeAr)+, (NeH)+, and (HeNe+) are known from optical and mass spectrometric studies. Neon also forms an unstable hydrate.

Properties

In a vacuum discharge tube, neon glows reddish orange.

It has over 40 times more refrigerating capacity per unit volume than liquid helium and more than three times that of liquid hydrogen. It is compact, inert, and is less expensive than helium when it meets refrigeration requirements.

Of all the rare gases, the discharge of neon is the most intense at ordinary voltages and currents.

Uses

Although neon advertising signs account for the bulk of its use, neon also functions in high-voltage indicators, lightning arrestors, wave meter tubes, and TV tubes. Neon and helium are used in making gas lasers. Liquid neon is now commercially available and is finding important application as an economical cryogenic refrigerant.

Costs

Neon costs about $2.00/l.