Need Help Finding a Service?
CLICK HERE - It's Free
  
11/15/2018

Add Environmental
Yellow Pages
To Your Site

Business Center
Business Reviews
Free Directories
Upgrade Your Listing
Environmental Bids & RFP Services
Financing Available
Dust Collectors
Mist Eliminators
Precipitators
Incinerators
Scrubbers
Filters
Ammonia Slip Analyzers
Chemiluminescence Analyzers
CO Analyzers
CO2 Analyzers
Flame Ionization Analyzers
HC Analyzers
Infrared Analyzers
Multi-Point Samplers
NOX Analyzers
Paramagnetic Analyzers
Photoacoustic Analyzers
Photoacoustic IR Analyzers
Process Control Analyzers
Tracer Gas Systems
VOC Analyzers
Remediation
WMD Equipment
Air Monitoring
PID Rental
Water Quality
Water Sampling
NFPA Labels
Waste Labels
Flammable Labels
Lighting Equipment
Pumping Equipment
Cubic Yard Boxes
55 Gallon Drums
Hazardous Waste Drums
Overpack Drums
Plastic Drums
Submit Resume
View Resumes
Environmental
Insurance
Reports & Mapping
Environmental
Software
Tank Inspection Services
Mold & Mildew Info
Mold Franchise
Mold Test Kits
Mold Training
OSHA Training
EPA Training
Wetland Training
Pumps
Water Wastewater
Grease Trap Bacteria
Pond Bacteria
Septic Tank Bacteria
* Celebrating our 22th year *
[ Home > Resources > Education > Periodic Table of the Elements ]
Copper

For pennies.

Atomic Number: 29
Atomic Symbol: Cu
Atomic Weight: 63.546
Electron Configuration: [Ar]4s13d10

History

(Latin cuprum , from the island of Cyprus) It is believed that copper has been mined for 5,000 years.

Properties

Copper is reddish and takes on a bright metallic luster. It is malleable, ductile, and a good conductor of heat and electricity (second only to silver in electrical conductivity).

Sources

Copper occasionally occurs native, and is found in many minerals such as cuprite, malachite, azurite, chalcopyrite, and bornite.

Large copper ore deposits are found in the U.S., Chile, Zambia, Zaire, Peru, and Canada. The most important copper ores are the sulfides, the oxides, and carbonates. From these, copper is obtained by smelting, leaching, and by electrolysis.

Uses

The electrical industry is one of the greatest users of copper. Iron's alloys -- brass and bronze -- are very important: all American coins are copper alloys and gun metals also contain copper.

Copper has wide use as an agricultural poison and as an algicide in water purification. Copper compounds, such as Fehling's solution, are widely used in analytical chemistry tests for sugar.

Availability

High-purity copper (99.999+ percent) is available commercially.

Isotopes available at Los Alamos National Laboratory