Need Help Finding a Service?
CLICK HERE - It's Free
  
11/15/2018

Add Environmental
Yellow Pages
To Your Site

Business Center
Business Reviews
Free Directories
Upgrade Your Listing
Environmental Bids & RFP Services
Financing Available
Dust Collectors
Mist Eliminators
Precipitators
Incinerators
Scrubbers
Filters
Ammonia Slip Analyzers
Chemiluminescence Analyzers
CO Analyzers
CO2 Analyzers
Flame Ionization Analyzers
HC Analyzers
Infrared Analyzers
Multi-Point Samplers
NOX Analyzers
Paramagnetic Analyzers
Photoacoustic Analyzers
Photoacoustic IR Analyzers
Process Control Analyzers
Tracer Gas Systems
VOC Analyzers
Remediation
WMD Equipment
Air Monitoring
PID Rental
Water Quality
Water Sampling
NFPA Labels
Waste Labels
Flammable Labels
Lighting Equipment
Pumping Equipment
Cubic Yard Boxes
55 Gallon Drums
Hazardous Waste Drums
Overpack Drums
Plastic Drums
Submit Resume
View Resumes
Environmental
Insurance
Reports & Mapping
Environmental
Software
Tank Inspection Services
Mold & Mildew Info
Mold Franchise
Mold Test Kits
Mold Training
OSHA Training
EPA Training
Wetland Training
Pumps
Water Wastewater
Grease Trap Bacteria
Pond Bacteria
Septic Tank Bacteria
* Celebrating our 22th year *
[ Home > Resources > Education > Periodic Table of the Elements ]
Cobalt

For permanent magnets.

Atomic Number: 27
Atomic Symbol: Co
Atomic Weight: 58.9332
Electron Configuration: [Ar]4s23d7

History

(Kobald, from the German, goblin or evil spirit, cobalos, Greek, mine) Brandt discovered cobalt in about 1735.

Sources

Cobalt occurs in the minerals cobaltite, smaltite, and erythrite, and is often associated with nickel , silver , lead , copper , and iron ores, from which it is most frequently obtained as a by-product. It is also present in meteorites.

Important ore deposits are found in Zaire, Morocco, and Canada. The U.S. Geological Survey has announced that the bottom of the north central Pacific Ocean may have cobalt-rich deposits at relatively shallow depths in water close to the the Hawaiian Islands and other U.S. Pacific territories.

Properties

Cobalt is a brittle, hard metal, resembling iron and nickel in appearance. It has a metallic permeability of about two thirds that of iron. Cobalt tends to exist as a mixture of two allotropes over a wide temperature range. The transformation is sluggish and accounts in part for the wide variation in reported data on physical properties of cobalt.

Uses

It is alloyed with iron, nickel and other metals to make Alnico, an alloy of unusual magnetic strength with many important uses. Stellite alloys, containing cobalt, chromium , and tungsten , are used for high-speed, heavy-duty, high temperature cutting tools, and for dies.

Cobalt is also used in other magnetic steels and stainless steels, and in alloys used in jet turbines and gas turbine generators. The metal is used in electroplating because of its appearance, hardness, and resistance to oxidation.

The salts have been used for centuries to produce brilliant and permanent blue colors in porcelain, glass, pottery, tiles, and enamels. It is the principal ingredient in Sevre's and Thenard's blue. A solution of the chloride is used as a sympathetic ink. Cobalt carefully used in the form of the chloride, sulfate, acetate, or nitrate has been found effective in correcting a certain mineral deficiency disease in animals.

Soils should contain 0.13 to 0.30 ppm of cobalt for proper animal nutrition.

Isotope

Cobalt-60, an artificial isotope, is an important gamma ray source, and is extensively used as a tracer and a radiotherapeutic agent.

Costs

Single compact sources of Cobalt-60 vary from about $1 to $10/curie, depending on quantity and specific activity.

Handling

Exposure to cobalt (metal fumes and dust) should be limited to 0.05 mg/m3 (8-hour time-weighted average 40-hour week).